Dragonflies and Damselflies

Dainty Damsels

As I already mentioned earlier, I had not paid attention to damselflies and the fact that there are many different types. I have since been keeping my eyes open and found a number of different ones.

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This is a male Tule Bluet damselfly (Enallagma carunculatum).

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It was fascinating to watch one eating. They like to eat insect larvae and it looks like this might have been the meal I watched it eating.

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The females can be brown or blue. This guy obviously favours the brown ones!

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This damselfly is a male Eastern Forktail and is one of the most common damselflies. You can find it in most wetlands, so it isn’t surprising that we have it around us.

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And this is a young female Eastern Forktail. Adult females are a powdery purplish blue.

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This could be another Forktail or it could be an Orange Bluet – detail is lacking to see if there is a fork at the end of the tail.

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And these might be Orange Bluets mating, but they didn’t stay around long enough for me to get a good photo or a detailed look at them.

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Although I didn’t get to see it hatch, it was nice to find a recently hatched damselfly. I think it is a Sedge Sprite.

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I found it much harder to identify the damselflies than I expected. They are divided into groups that help divide them. There are broad-winged damselflies – this one obviously doesn’t have a broad wing. There are spread-winged damselflies and they spread out their wings slightly to the side, looking a little like a slim dragonfly. Then there are narrow-winged damselflies, which this one obviously is, as are all the damselflies I have found. However, trying to figure out the type of narrow-winged damselfly when I don’t get a good photo or look at them is tricky and it really doesn’t matter. I just was curious as to just how many different types of damselflies we have, given that I knew so little about them just a few weeks ago. The answer is many, which is not very surprising given the abundance of wildlife we have found time and time again in a relatively small area.

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